Course Descriptions

Dual Enrollment – College General Psychology (PSYC124) – Grade 12th

The survey of psychology includes human development, sensation and perception, learning and thinking, emotions, motivation, personality, and stress, as well as psychological disorders and their treatment. The study of psychology is the science that describes and explains how people think, feel, and act. This course will help each individual to understand the significant findings from psychology that apply to human behavior and may lead to a better understanding of ourselves.

Dual Enrollment – College Developmental Psychology (PSYC128) – Grade 12th

This course is the study of human life from conception to death. Emphasis is placed on the physical, cognitive, social, and psychological and spiritual development of the individual. Issues are discussed regarding the continuity of human development throughout the life span, how early experiences may affect later development, and the influence of genetics, familial factors, and the environment.

FLA Scholars Project – Grade 12th

A project challenging students to go beyond the learning that occurs as the result of their prescribed educational program by developing projects that demonstrate their intellectual and creative abilities. Each student shall complete a project in one area of concentrated study under the direction of the Forest Lake Academy school staff. The project will demonstrate the student’s ability to apply, analyze, synthesize, evaluate information, and communicate significant knowledge and comprehension.

Introduction to Business

This course introduces students to the world of business and the economic roles of consumer and entrepreneur. During this course, the student will grow as a reader, writer, and thinker as they analyze business foundations and trends. This course will serve as a background for other, more detailed business courses, such as accounting, marketing and business law, as well as preparation for future employment, financial literacy, and consumer decision-making.

Introduction to Speech

This is an introduction course to speech communication, aimed to help students communicate with those directly around them, as well as on a grander, or more public scale. The skills practiced and explored in this course are beneficial to every student, regardless of future ambitions, as every profession (and every human relationship) is centered around effectively communicating. It also includes a targeted focus on how to overcome anxieties associated with public speaking.

Theatrical Arts – Grade 12th

Senior Class Play class is a project to plan, prepare, and present a theatrical performance. Class activity revolves around play rehearsals. The cast is chosen by tryouts, although it is sometimes the case that anyone who tries out may receive a small part or a walk-on part. Chosen cast members are expected to attend rehearsals faithfully, help with costume needs, and sometimes assist with preparation of the back- drop. It is important that students “embrace” this project as their own as a top performance requires more than common class attendance; for example, dress rehearsal is a three to four hour Sunday evening commitment.

Video Production

This course will instruct students in an alternate form of communication. Students will learn the specialized vocabulary of the film and television industry and use it to express themselves clearly and concisely in their writing about film and television. Students will develop ideas individually or within a group, utilizing the video techniques learned in class. Also, a major part of this class is to create the school Biweekly Events Broadcast. This course will also introduce skills in the area of Data Management, and it will teach student critical thinking skills needed for a successful professional life.

Yearbook

A course designed to provide students with the opportunity to accomplish independent achievement in the journalism field through a hands-on experience. The class functions as a publishing staff with student leadership to produce the Mirror, the school’s yearbook. Staff assignments include editors, writers, computer graphic artists, proofreaders, and photographers, with assignments overlapping. Each student will be assigned a position under the direction of the student editors.

Performing Arts

Cantabile

Cantabile is a small select choral ensemble and is available by audition only. All Cantabile members are required to be in Voices of Forest Lake and attend all Concerts scheduled for Voices and Cantabile. Concerts for this ensemble include all concerts listed for Voices of Forest Lake and additional concerts in the community, in area churches, and on tours.

Band

Band is open to students who have basic performing skills on woodwinds, brass or percussion. Placement is by audition. Members are required to attend all concerts scheduled. Those performances include Parent Weekend, Christmas, Alumni Weekend, Festival of the Arts, local church concerts, band trip and Spring concert.

Solid Bronze

Solid Bronze is a handbell ensemble available by audition only. This performing ensemble will learn the art of ringing English Handbells. Concerts include Parent Weekend, Christmas, Alumni Weekend, Festival of the Arts, Spring sacred and secular concerts, Tour, and other appointments in area churches and community.

String Ensemble

String Ensemble is open to students who have basic performing skills on violin, viola, cello and string bass. Placement is by audition. Members are required to attend all concerts scheduled. Those performances include Parent Weekend, Christmas, Alumni Weekend, Festival of the Arts, local church concerts, strings trip and Spring concert.

Voices of Forest Lake

Voices of Forest Lake is the large choir which is available to all students. An interview and placement audition to determine the voice part of each student is required for membership in this ensemble. Members are required to attend all Concerts scheduled for Voices. Concerts include Parent Weekend, Christmas, Disney Candlelight Procession, Alumni Weekend, Festival of the Arts, Spring sacred and secular concerts.

Visual Arts

Ceramics I

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Freshman-senior; Pre-requisite: None; Art fee required. This course will enable students to recognize the properties, possibilities and limitations of clay using various hand-building techniques. Students will be able to create ceramics pieces that communicate idea and demonstrate basic craftsmanship and technical elements. Students will demonstrate the use of media and associated tools and equipments for ceramics in a safe, responsible, and appropriate manner.

Ceramics II

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Freshman-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Ceramics I; Art fee required. In this course, students continue applying knowledge of properties of clay and various hand-building and throwing techniques to create more complex ceramics pieces. Students will be able to identify career opportunities related to ceramics, and demonstrate awareness of appropriate art vocabulary.

Ceramics Honors

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Sophomore-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Ceramics I & II with at least “A-“; Art fee required; strongly recommended for students who plan to continue visual arts as a major or minor. The purpose of this course is to enable students to continue advancing in ceramics in individually-identified areas of focus. Students will be able to create complex ceramics pieces that demonstrate awareness of the potential personal and social benefits associated with the production and exhibition of ceramics, and identify related career opportunities. Students will identify the role of ceramics as works of art through history, culture, and society.

Digital Photography I

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Sophomore-senior; Pre-requisite: None; Art fee required. This course will enable students to develop the basics of digital photography and using studio equipments. Students will be able to create images that communicate idea, and demonstrate the use of media and associated tools and equipment for photography in a safe, responsible, and appropriate manner.

Digital Photography II

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Sophomore-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Digital Photography I; Art fee required. In this course, students continue applying knowledge of photography and further develop skills and creative approaches to digital photography and create images that communicate idea. Students will be able to identify career opportunities related to photography, and demonstrate awareness of appropriate art vocabulary.

Digital Photography Honors

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Junior-Senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Digital Photography I & II with at least “A-“;  Art fee required; strongly recommended for students who plan to continue visual arts as a major or minor. The purpose of this course is to enable students to continue advancing in digital photography in individually-identified areas of focus. Students demonstrate awareness of the potential personal and social benefits associated with the production and exhibition of photography, and identify related career opportunities. Students will be able to create images that demonstrate awareness of the role of photography as works of art through history, culture, and society.

Drawing and Painting I

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Freshman-senior; Pre-requisite: None; Art fee required. This course will enable students to develop the basic skills and creative approaches to drawing and painting and using studio tools and equipments. Students will be able to create artworks that communicate idea, and demonstrate the use of media and associated tools and equipment for drawing and painting in a safe, responsible, and appropriate manner.

Drawing and Painting II

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Freshman-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Drawing & Painting I; Art fee required. In this course, students continue applying knowledge and experience to further develop skills and creative approaches to drawing and painting. Students will identify career opportunities related to drawing and painting, and demonstrate awareness of appropriate art vocabulary.

Drawing and Painting Honors

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Sophomore-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Drawing and Painting I & II with at least “A-“ ; Art fee required; strongly recommended for students who plan to continue visual arts as a major or minor. The purpose of this course is to enable students to continue advancing in drawing and painting in individually-identified areas of focus. Students will be able to create complex artworks that demonstrate awareness of the potential personal and social benefits associated with the production and exhibition of drawing and painting, and identify related career opportunities. Students will demonstrate awareness of the role of drawing and painting as works of art through history, culture, and society.

Sculpting I

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Sophomore-senior; Pre-requisite: None; Art fee required. This course will enable students to recognize the properties, possibilities and limitations of clay, use of tools and equipments, and develop the basics skills and creative approaches to sculpting. Students will be able to create sculptures that communicate idea, and demonstrate the use of media and associated tools and equipments for sculpting in a safe, responsible, and appropriate manner.

Sculpting II

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Sophomore-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Sculpting I; Art fee required. In this course, students continue applying knowledge of properties of clay, and further develop skills and creative approaches to sculpting to create sculptures that communicate idea. Students will be able to identify career opportunities related to sculpting, and demonstrate awareness of appropriate art vocabulary.

Sculpting Honors

1 Semester; 0.5 Unit credit; Grade level: Junior-senior; Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Sculpting I & II with at least “A-“  Art fee required; strongly recommended for students who plan to continue visual arts as a major or minor. The purpose of this course is to enable students to continue advancing in sculpting in individually-identified areas of focus. Students will be able to create sculptures that demonstrate awareness of the potential personal and social benefits associated with the production and exhibition of sculpting, and identify related career opportunities. Students will identify the role of sculpting as works of art through history, culture, and society.

French I

An introduction to the French language and culture, with emphasis on the development of the basic communicative skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) and grammatical structures. Requires active participation in instructor-coordinated multimedia and online activities as a mandatory component. This course fulfills the standards of the North American Division of SDA (NAD).

French II

A course designed to review and build upon material introduced in French I. This course will give emphasis on the development of the advanced communicative skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) and grammatical structures. Requires active participation in instructor-coordinated multimedia and online activities as a mandatory component. This course fulfills the standards of the North American Division of SDA (NAD).

Spanish I

An introduction to the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures, with emphasis on the development of the basic communicative skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) and grammatical structures. Requires active participation in instructor-coordinated multimedia and online activities as a mandatory component. This course fulfills the standards of the North American Division of SDA (NAD).

Spanish II

A course designed to review and build upon material presented in Spanish I. The activities provided are designed to increase the student’s proficiency in the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The program utilizes small group activities and students’ involvement. It presents a more complex structure and awareness of the Spanish culture. Success in this class depends heavily on the student’s cooperation, participation, curiosity and consistent practice in and out of class. This course fulfills the standards of the North American Division of SDA (NAD).

Spanish III

This class will provide an advanced program for the development of language skills. The core of the course will provide common experience for language and a broader understanding of culture through reading in literature and civilization. The class is conducted primarily in the target language.

Health Science I

This course is designed to introduce students to the core knowledge for healthcare as defined by the National Consortium for Health Science Education and to the career clusters within the health care industry. Due to the anatomy component of the course, some illustrations and study materials may be explicit.

Health Science II

This course is designed to introduce students to Medical Terminology and its use, observation skills, reporting, and critical thinking. Due to the anatomy component of the course, some illustrations and study materials may be explicit.

Health Science III

This course will introduce students to the health care emergency response system and provide opportunity for American Heart Association certification in Basic Life Support for the Health Care Provider and First Aid. Due to the anatomy component of the course, some illustrations and study materials may be explicit.

Principles of Biomedical Science

In this introductory course, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems.

English 09

A whole language course emphasizing fundamentals of language, reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and vocabulary. Reading experiences will include selections from the textbook, as well as other assigned literary works.

English 09 Honors

English 09 Honors provides a college level academic atmosphere that expands students’ reading and writing experiences, building a foundation for their high school and post-secondary academic careers. The course facilitates students’ improvement in their reading, writing, and communication skills through various effective strategies, including classroom talk, collaborative group work, writing to learn, literacy groups, questioning, and scaffolding. These projects, and the course as a whole, allows students to showcase their communication and critical thinking skills.

World Literature 10

A course focusing on literature written by world authors. Students will grow as readers, writers, and thinkers as they analyze literature and reflect on themes and apply them to life experiences. Reading experiences will include selections from the textbook, as well as other assigned literary works.

World Literature 10 Honors

A course encouraging students to explore and develop critical thinking skills and begin the transition toward independent achievement through literature, media, speaking, and writing skills. The class theme will be “Our culture—now and then,” with literature and activities that depict culture from creation to the present and future time. Essays, tests, speeches, activities, projects, and research will provide opportunities for students to apply class themes to current culture. Grammar practice and vocabulary study are included.

American Literature 11

A study of the American tradition in literature from the Puritan era to the Modern period is included. Students trace the role of the past in the development of present literature culture. A study of vocabulary is included. This is an intensive reading course that provides students the opportunity to read, discuss, critique and present diverse examples of “classic” American literature. Reading experiences will include selections from the textbook such as poetry, drama, and short stories as well as other assigned literary works.

American Literature 11 Honors

This course includes the study of United States History, American Literature, and Composition. Through the blending of these three areas the student is able to immerse themselves in the history and culture of the time period being studied. Critical thinking skills are developed and practiced through analysis of historical events, literature, and composition activities. A research project is required and a study of vocabulary is included. This course is limited to juniors with an 85% or higher in previous English class. First preference is given to students who are enrolled in the Honors program. Transfer students must complete a writing assessment before admittance to the class.

English Literature 12

English 12 is a whole language course combining the studies of literature and writing. A survey of British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon Era through the Modern Era is included. In addition, the course includes a strong emphasis on writing skills incorporating a large variety of different genres ranging from expository to research writing. This course is typically taken by seniors following their completion of English 9-11.

Dev. Lang. Arts ESOL I (DLAE I)

This is a course designed to best serve new comers to the United States (one year). In addition to providing systematic language development, this course provides individualized instruction intended to fill in gaps. Students learn academic vocabulary that is frequently used in other courses to ensure success across the curriculum. A great deal of emphasis is placed phonics and pronunciation.

Dev. Lang. Arts ESOL II (DLAE II)

This is a course designed to cultivate students’ ability to integrate the oral and written form of expression. Students learn American expressions, literary figures of speech, and vocabulary word families. A significant emphasis is placed on grammatical structure so as to enhance presenting and writing skills, which are practical for college and for careers. The nonfiction genre is explored at length.

Dev. Lang. Arts ESOL III (DLAE III)

This course uniquely enhances vocabulary, thinking, comprehension, and response skills. Analysis of a variety of fictional literature from the Standard English textbook is used with modified text, with the scope of transitioning students into mainstream English. The conventions of writing are cultivated in preparation for college and for the acquisition of clear communication.

Dual Enrollment – College English (ENGL101 & ENGL102) – Grade 12th

This course focuses on writing as a means for authentic expression and exploration. Emphasis is on the writing process, especially revision. Students write several expository essays organized according to prescribed modes and learn specific writing skills and principles which readily apply to most writing tasks. The course meets the requirement for a written communication course.

Algebra I

A course where the foundation for algebra will be formed. The key content involves writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. Quadratic equations are solved by factoring, completing the square, graphically, or by application of the quadratic formula. The course also includes study of monomial and polynomial expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratio, and proportion.

Algebra I-A/B

A course addressing Math as the language of the Universe. The world of numbers, graphs, functions or formulas and the ability to use them to help understand the world will help students evaluate the information and apply it to everyday life.
By the end of the class you will be able to do the following:

  • Identify SDA Christian principles and values in correlation with mathematics.
  • Develop abilities in mathematics.
  • Be able to apply math knowledge and skills to a variety of purposes.
  • Be able to understand concepts involving real numbers.
  • Be able to represent mathematical situations using algebraic symbols and models.
  • Be able to apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to interpret and solve problems.
  • Be able to analyze results and draw appropriate conclusions.

Algebra II

Algebra II is a course emphasizing functions (quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarith- mic, rational, radical) and systems and their use in real-world applications. The complex number system is explored and a brief intro- duction to statistics and trigonometry is given.

Algebra II Honors

Honors Algebra II includes all the aspects of Algebra II at a faster pace and includes an introduction to conic sections.

Dual Enrollment – College Calculus I with Analytical Geometry – Grade 12th

This course is a study of the mathematics of motion and change. Topics include limits, continuity, analytic geometry, and the differential and integral calculus of elementary trigonometric and transcendental functions. Application of the above topics to science, business, engineering, and the other branches of mathematics is explored.

Dual Enrollment – College Elementary Statistics – Grade 12th

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, normal distribution, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression.

Geometry

Geometry is the study of lines, angles and plane figures such as triangles and quadrilaterals. The student is taught to write formal proofs and to apply formulas involving perimeters, areas, volumes, and surface areas. Basic principles of two and three dimensional figures, algebraic skills, and coordinate geometry will be used in problem solving situations. Trigonometry is introduced and algebraic concepts such as factoring and two-variable equations are applied to geometric situations. A main purpose of the student of geometry is the development of reasoning ability, logical processing. Geometry is a requirement for admission into most four-year colleges.

Geometry Honors

An advanced study in geometry for the more advanced student. It is a rigorous, logical development of the deductive system of reasoning. Emphasis is on the development of logic, formal proofs, problem solving, and algebraic applications to geometry.

Precalculus

Precalculus focuses on polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions within the real and complex number systems. Solving and graphing equations of all types is emphasized in preparation for learning calculus. Real-world applications are explored regularly.

Statistics

Statistics is the study of the methods that plan experiments, obtain data, analyze, interpret, and draw conclusions based on
the data. Statistical literacy is an essential skill that enables people to understand and make sensible decisions. It has astonishing powers to improve decision making accuracy and test new ideas. It is a key analytical tool used in education, the sciences, business administration, medicine, the social sciences, sports, politics, and other related fields.

Math for College Readiness

This course emphasizes skills identified as important for success in college math. Previously learned high-school level math skills are solidified, and students learn to think mathematically about real-life situations. The goals are for students to learn to apply math intuitively, practice more detailed calculations, and become more mathematically independent. This course also helps students develop strategies for taking math tests in this course and for college entry.

Fitness for Life

This physical education class is designed to introduce each student to a variety of physical activities that enables them to maintain a healthy lifestyle through physical education and to recognize the importance of the lifelong benefits of exercise. Students will do classwork, labs, and fitness standards as well as be exposed to various team sports. Through this class each student will have basic knowledge to know how to evaluate one’s self and how to create and implement a fitness program. The students will also be taught the importance of developing balanced lifestyles between, mental, physical, spiritual, and social development.

Health

This class is designed to introduce each stu- dent to a variety of health topics and issues such as healthful living, mental, physical and emotional wellness, suicide, drugs, alcohol, reproduction, family dynamics, sexual education & responsibility, violence, abuse and STD’s. Students will also be taught the importance of developing balanced lifestyles between, mental, physical, spiritual, and social development.

Individual Sports and Conditioning

This class is designed to teach students the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness and expose them to a number of activities they can participate in for a lifetime. The students will use Heart Rate Monitors each day in class to make sure they are working in their target zone. The students have many choices of activities such as basketball, soccer, weight room, workout videos, run/walk, badminton, etc. This class will also teach the importance of individual fitness as well as the importance of developing spiritual, and social development and the balanced lifestyles between, mental, physical, importance of the lifelong benefits of exercise.

Bible 09

Students will encounter God, Christ, and His plan for our lives. Through searching the scriptures for His existence and character, they will discover how to enter into a lasting and fulfilling relationship.

Bible 10

Students will encounter God, Christ, and His plan for our lives. Through searching the scriptures for His existence and character, they will discover how to enter into a lasting and fulfilling relationship.

Bible 11

Identify the loving God and the plan of salvation by faith through Jesus Christ as the center of Seventh-day Adventist beliefs.

  • Develop Abilities in Bible Doctrines
  • Be able to apply Bible Doctrines knowledge and skills
  • Be able to understand the Seventh-day Adventist beliefs as grounded in the Bible

Bible 12

This course is all about exposing our students to strategies that help manage their spirituality, finances, time, and negative emotions, as well as developing communication, employment, and parenting skills. Senior Bible is also about having the correct information before making decisions. Making good decisions starts with knowing the facts, understanding the consequences, and having the confidence to choose well. We’ll deal with real issues like nutrition, substance abuse, coping with stress, and what to do about sex. We have found that, when our students are better equipped that leads them to be more motivated to become self-sufficient and actively and positively control their future. This course comes with a long-term payoff. The good decisions students make now will set a positive direction they can follow for a lifetime.

Introduction to Christianity

This course will focus on the basics of Christianity and who we are as Christians. It will help student learn to use the bible and follow the context in it (from Adam to Christ).

Servant Leadership I & II

Servant Leadership should be how we live our lives. It is the practice of Loving God, Loving each other and loving ourselves. In Servant Leadership II the focus will be on creating activities for R.O.C. Campus Ministries that will be R.E.A.L. (Group Publishing). These activities will be:

R: Relational with peers and Jesus
E: Experiential in learning how to build a relationship with Jesus
A: Applicable to life so that students can take these activities back to their churches and youth groups
L: Learner based to meet the learning style of each student

Students should leave F.L.A. knowing how to be Jesus, how to lead as Jesus led and hopefully they will stay connected with their church as they leave for college

Biology I

This laboratory course provides a solid introduction to the study of life and its Creator. Interactions of living and nonliving conditions are studied. It explores such topics as scientific method, logic, cell functions, botany, zoology, genetics, microbiology, human physiology, and ecology.

Biology I Honors

This laboratory course provides a solid introduction to the study of life and its Creator. Interactions of living and nonliving conditions are studied. It explores such topics as scientific method, logic, cell functions, botany, zoology, genetics, microbiology, human physiology, and ecology. Beyond the regular biology curriculum, students will do addition projects and assignments as well as delve deeper into select topics.

Chemistry

A laboratory course study on the composition of matter and the changes matter undergoes. This course will help prepare for a general chemistry course at the college level. This course includes a laboratory component that will be a compliment to the concepts learned during the course. The key concepts this course will cover are:

    • Identify the principles of SDA Christian values in correlation with science.
    • Develop abilities in science.
    • Be able to apply science knowledge and skills to a variety of purposes.
    • Be able to understand relationships between matter and energy and how they interact.
    • Be able to safely explore chemical concepts.
    • Be able to analyze chemical data.
    • Be able to apply the principles of physics to health, life, and the physical environment.

Chemistry Honors

A rigorous introductory-level science course. This course broaches general chemistry topics then examines each topic more thoroughly than in general chemistry. Due to this course’s heavy math component, students are expected to excel in algebra and mathematic problem solving. Exams will reflect more depth and rigor than general chemistry exams. Topics include symbols and metric system, matter, formulas, chemical equations, atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, nuclear chemistry, gasses, solutions, bonding, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, pH, equilibrium, and organic chemistry. Laboratory experiments and activities complement theory while emphasizing safety and science writing skills. This course is a college preparatory course and its rigors will reflect a movement towards college level work. At the end of the year, students will leave with a foundation in chemical principles and concepts. The core concepts are reflected below:

        • Identify the principles of SDA Christian values in correlation with science.
        • Develop abilities in science.
        • Be able to apply science knowledge and skills to a variety of purposes.
        • Be able to understand relationships between matter and energy and how they interact.
        • Be able to safely explore chemical concepts.
        • Be able to analyze chemical data.

Dual Enrollment – College Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL101) – Grade 12th

This course is the first semester of a two-semes- ter course. BIOL 101 is a study of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems of the human body, along with their cytology, histology, and chemistry. Three hours of lecture each week.

Dual Enrollment – College Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL102) – Grade 12th

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course. BIOL 102 is a study if the endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Three hours of lecture each week.

Earth Science

This course is an amalgamation of units from Biology, Earth, Space and Physical Science. It is designed to facilitate student’s understanding of interrelationships among the biotic and abiotic elements of the environment, whereby, building for themselves a body of knowledge through reference to text, electronic simulation, and direct interaction with factors of the environment and classroom assessments. Students will have the opportunity for self-assessment as well as for teacher guidance and assessment throughout the course including the preparation and finalization of two semester Problem Solving Projects, which focus on research, organization, and drafting strategies. Ultimately students will be able to distinguish between wholesome and unhealthy practices affecting the environment and developed a sense of stewardship for God’s creation while being prepared for more advanced learning.

Environmental Science

An integrated science course which allows a student to develop understanding and knowledge of the interrelationships of the natural world and humanity. Humanity’s effect on the natural environment will be explored while study topics such as conservation, biodiversity, earth dynamics and waste management. Students will evaluate risks related with environmental problems and explore alternate solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Physics

A laboratory course study predicting behavior of objects in our world. This course will help prepare for a general physics course at the college level. This course includes a laboratory component that will be a compliment to the concepts learned during the course. The key concepts this course will cover are:

        • Identify the principles of SDA Christian values in correlation with science.
        • Develop abilities in science.
        • Be able to apply science knowledge and skills to a variety of purposes.
        • Be able to understand relationships between matter and energy and how they interact and move in our environment.
        • Be able to safely explore physical concepts.
        • Be able to analyze physical data.
        • Be able to apply the principles of physics to health, life, and the physical environment.

Physics Honors

Honors Physics is an inquiry based course designed to explore the aspect of predicting behavior of objects in our world through laboratories, data analysis, problem solving, and discussions with an emphasis on mathematical applications. Students considering this course should be self- directed learners with strong mathematical computational skills. The following are the core concepts for this course:

        • Identify the principles of SDA Christian values in correlation with science.
        • Develop abilities in science.
        • Be able to apply science knowledge and skills to a variety of purposes.
        • Be able to understand relationships between matter and energy and how they interact.
        • Be able to safely explore physics concepts.
        • Be able to analyze physics data.
        • Be able to apply the principles of physics to health, life, and the physical environment.

AP United States Government and Politics

AP Government is designed to give the senior a learning experience equal to an introductory college course on American government and politics. The course requires preparation through reading in the textbook and study of current events for class discussions. This course is intended to prepare the student for the AP College Board exam on American government and politics in May.

Economics with Financial Literacy

The study of business, a major component of our economy, is increasingly important to all. Especially in light of these changing economic times, everyone in our economy interacts with business—through the products we buy, the advertisements we see and hear, the jobs we hold, and the money we invest. From many perspectives, it is important that young people understand the role of business in our society and begin to comprehend what their relationship is to business and the economy in which they live. The basic objectives of this course focus on introducing students to the world of business and helping prepare them for a more meaningful and beneficial interaction with businesses and our economy.

United States Government

This is a one-semester course designed to help the students to view democracy not as a spectator sport but as a civic responsibility that demands active participation. The course aims to encourage the enthusiastic participation of the students in the political process, which is critical to strengthening our democracy in the future. The course offers a comprehensive program in the structure and function of federal, state and local government. At the same time, it calls attention to the basic values on which our political and legal systems are based and the principles that give direction to the ways in which those systems work.

United States History

This course is a survey of key figures and events in our nation’s story from the colonial era to the present. There will be an emphasis on the struggle of different groups for freedom in the U.S.

United States History Honors

This course includes the study of United States History, American Literature, and Composition. Through the blending of these three areas the students are able to immerse themselves in the history and culture of the time period being studied. Critical thinking skills are developed and practiced through analysis of historical events, literature, and composition activities. A research project is required and a study of vocabulary is included. This course is limited to juniors with an 85% or higher in previous English class. First preference is given to stu- dents who are enrolled in the Honors program. Transfer students must complete a writing assessment before admittance to the class.

World History

This course involves a survey of history dealing with the world’s early civilizations to the present. Special attention is given to the rise of Western civilizations. Themes are presented to show that from America to Asia people are more alike than they realize. Throughout history humans have confronted similar obstacles, have struggled to achieve similar goals and continually have strived to better themselves and the world around them. Students will be challenged to engage in critical thinking skill- building activities that focus on the challenges of the periods they study.

World History Honors

This World History honors course seeks to model its format off the AP World History course model. Students will be challenged to engage in critical thinking skill-building activities that focus on the challenges of the periods they study. The course is broken up into a set of time periods, with a series of themes that allows the teacher to focus the information and a group of habits of mind that will help focus the overall teaching. The course will take a thematic approach, in which societies are looked at through the prism of themes that will help the students make connections between various societies in various periods. The course will run for two semesters.

Computer Essentials

  • Project based course that introduces the students to the fascinating world of integrated media and technologies
  • It will provide students with an opportunity to learn a smart approach to technology and media.
  • This course will also provide an introduction to media design using the iPad as a launching platform.
  • Students will learn basic video, audio and graphic design methods and skills that will help them in their careers at FLA
    and beyond.
  • This course will also introduce skills in the areas of cloud computing, mobile collaboration and data management.
  • And it will teach student critical thinking skills needed for a successful professional life.
  • Standards:
    • Develop an SDA Christian approach toward technology and its uses
    • Develop abilities in computer/mobile computer technology
    • Be able to apply ethically the knowledge and skills of media technology
    • Be able to understand history, common terms, and concepts and to utilize technological reasoning
    • Be able to manipulate data using appropriate software applications and technologies
    • Be able to communicate and work collaboratively utilizing computer technology
    • Be able to practice legal and ethical behavior in relation to technology

Computer Science Principles

Using Python® as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. Computer Science Principles helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation.

Principals of Engineering

Through problems that engage and challenge, students explore a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms,
the strength of structures and materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation.

Robotics Engineering I

Robotics Engineering I and II-A/B (2 semesters)
This course will offer the students the opportunity to explore the broad field of Robotics Engineering. Topics will include: The history of Robotics and Technology, Engineering Design Process, the latest technology and its implications, robot programming language, Computer Aided Design, and 3D printing.

  • Introduction to Engineering and Robotics
  • Components of a remote control device
  • The latest technology and its implications
  • Fundamentals basic programming
  • Introduction to CAD, Computer Aided Design

Robotics Engineering II A/B Honors

A – Java Programming Language
This project-based course covers programming topics in Java, and robotics programming, which include: object oriented programming, methods, classes, and objects, arrays, loops, and more. Students will be able to design, build, and program an autonomous wheeled robot. Also, motivated students will have the opportunity to take a Java programming placement test for Engineering, and Computer Science Major.

  • Introduction to Java Programming
  • Methods, Classes, and Objects
  • Making Decisions
  • Loops
  • Arrays
  • Introduction to Inheritance
  • File Input and Output
  • Robot Programming Lab Activities

B – CAD Computer Aided Design
This project-based course covers topics in Computer Aided Engineering and 3D printing. Students will use Autodesk Inventor to design, build robots, and 3D print. Topics will include: entity creation, editing, dimensioning, file management, constraints, parametric and assembly modeling, and plotting. A “hands on” approach will be taken while using PC based AutoCAD software. Applications will be taken from a variety of disciplines.

  • Introduction to Computer Aided Design
  • Basic CAD Drawing Techniques
  • Parametric Modeling Fundamentals
  • Editing with Grips
  • Constraints Fundamentals
  • Advanced Construction Tools
  • 3D Printing
  • Robot Design Challenge Project presentation

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Your Name:*
E-mail:*
Phone:*
-